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US History Chapter 28
Practice Test
Test Monday, April 2, 2007
200 questions (96 additional not coded or posted)
Note: There are 200 questions. When you have inputed your answers for all questions, click on the "Finished" button. Your score will show up in the box next to the "Finished" button and correct answers will receive a check next to their input boxes. This test is NOT case-sensitive.



The western half of the US was called the (1.) . It was in the shape of a (2.) , with (3.) (number, no commas) miles on each side.


By the year (4.) , the entire west was carved into four territories, listed alphabetically, (5.) , (6.) , (7.) , and (8.) . The third is nicknamed the (9.) .


In the year (10.) , there were (11.) number of Native Americans.


The (12.) people introduced the (13.) to Native Americans. This caused tribes to be more nomadic and warlike.


Three diseases that the "white intruders" spread among Native Americans were, listed alphabetically, (14.) , (15.) , and (16.) .


The (17.) Indians were displaced by the (18.) from their ancestral lands at the headwaters of the (19.) River. They then aggressively expanded at the expense of three Native American tribes, listed alphabetically, the (20.) , the (21.) and the (22.) . They especially hunted the (23.) (one of the three) in the year (24.) killing over (25.) (#) men, women and children.


The federal government tried to pacify the Plains Indians at (26.) in the year (27.) and at (28.) in the year (29.) . This marked the beginnings of the (30.) in the West.


The main areas to which the federal government herded Native Americans to in the 1860s were the (31.) reservation and present-day (32.) .


One federal Indian official of the US government had an annual salary of $ (33.) (#), but returned home after (34.) (#) years with an estimated "savings" of (35.) (#).


During the Civil War, the (36.) of (37.) faced starvation. They went on a warpath and killed several hundred. After a summary trial, (38.) (#) of these Indians were hanged at a well-attended mass execution.


Between the years (39.) and (40.) , there was constant warefare in the West between Indians and whites.


One of the four US black units to serve in the military against the Indians was the (41.) . About (42.) (fraction: x/x) of all US soldiers fighting the Indians were black.


Three American generals who fought in the Civil War and now did good work against the Indians were, listed alphabetically, (43.) , (44.) , and (45.) .


At (46.) in the state of (47.) , Colonel (48.) 's militia massacred about (49.) (#) Indians in cold blood after they had been promised immunity.


In the year (50.) , a group of (51.) Indians tried to block construction of the (52.) to the (53.) . They ambushed the (54.) (#) soldiers and civilians under Captain (55.) in the (56.) in the state of (57.) . There were (58.) (#) American survivors. American soldiers' bodies were found grotesquely mutilated and one soldier had (59.) arrows in his face. This event became known as the (60.) . Colonel (61.) wrote about the bitter feeling toward the Indians this aroused. This battle, one of the few Indian victories, led to another (62.) , this time in the year (63.) , under which the Indians were given the (64.) reservation.


In the year (65.) , Colonel (66.) led a "scientific" expedition into the (67.) in the state of (68.) and announced that he had discovered (69.) . Miners rushed in, and (70.) Indians under leaders including the one who stayed away from battle, (71.) , fought back. Custer's (72.) , nearly (73.) (fraction; x/x) of which was immigrants, consisted of (74.) (#) officers and men. The Indians under the leader that fought with them, (75.) , had a force of some (76.) well-armed warriors along the (77.) . They killed every American in what's known as the (78.) , nicknamed (79.) .


In the year (80.) , the (81.) Indians of the state of (82.) had their reservation's size decreased by (83.) (#) percent after (84.) was discovered. Chief (85.) surrendered his (86.) (#) Indians after a tortuous (87.) (#) -mile (88.) (#) -month trek across the (89.) toward (90.) . They hoped to meet with (91.) after his fight at the (92.) . They lost, were told that they would be sent to their ancestral lands in the state of (93.) , and were sent to a dusty reservation in the state of (94.) , where (95.) (#) percent of them died of disease. The survivors were eventually allowed to go to their ancestral lands.


Also, the (96.) tribe of the states of, alphabetically, (97.) and (98.) were the most difficult to subdue. Under the leadership of (99.) , they retreated into Mexico as federal troops chased them using the new communication device known as the (100.) , which the Indians called (101.) . Scattered remnants of the Indian forces were captured, and the women were exiled to (102.) . The members of this tribe ultimately became successfull farmers in the state of (103.) .


There were three main factors that helped engineer the "taming" of the Indians. The first and most important was the (104.) , which quickly brought fresh troops, supplies, and settlers to fight the Indians and take their land. Second, there were (105.) , to which the Indians had little or no resistance toward. Third, the virtual extermination of the (106.) resulted in the near-extermination of the Plain Indians.


The buffalo were described by early Spaniards as (107.) . Their dried dung provided fuel, called (108.) . One man, (109.) , was hired to hunt buffalo and killed over (110.) (#) animals in (111.) (#) months. After the Civil War, there were some (112.) (#) million buffalo on the western plains. But by the year (113.) (#) there were fewer than (114.) (#) buffalo left. A few thousand have been kept alive for tourists at (115.) .


Writer of children's literature (116.) , from the state of (117.) , published (118.) , a book chronicling the sorry record of the government's dealing with Indians. She later wrote (119.) , a love story of injustice to the Indians in the state of (120.) that sold about (121.) (#) copies.


In 1884, christian reformers succsesfully persuaded the federal government to outlaw the sacred (122.) . When the (123.) cult spread to the (124.) , the US army stamped it out in 1890 at the so-called (125.) . An estimated (126.) (#) Indians were killed as well as (127.) (#) Americans.


The (128.) of (129.) (#) dissolved many tribes as legal entities, wiped out tribal ownership of land, and set up individual Indian family heads with (130.) (#) free acres. If the Indians behaved themselves, they would get full title to their holdings and citizenship in (131.) (#) years. Full citizenship was granted to all Indians in the year (132.) (#). Reservation land not given to the Indians under this act was sold to the railroad and white settlers, and proceeds went to educate and "civilize" the Indians in projects such as the one that created the (133.) in the state of (134.) . This school educated Indian children to be like white people. The school founder's motto was (135.) . In the 1890s, the government sent (136.) to teach Indian women the art of sewing and to preach virtues of chastity and hygiene. In the year (137.) (#), Indians held (138.) (#) million acres of land. By the year (139.) (#), Indians had lost (140.) (#) percent of this land. This act was the government's official Indian policy until the (141.) , also called the (142.) , which happened in the year (143.) (#).


Before the Europeans first appeared on North America, the vast plain from northern (144.) to (145.) was home to some (146.) (#) different tribes. The Indians either carried their possessions or used wheelless carts called (147.) , which were pulled by their only beast of burden, the (148.) dog. Some Spanish introduced horses escaped captivity and became (149.) , the whild horses of the American West. One Indian, (150.) of the (151.) , described how good things were before the white people, which he calls (152.) , arrived.


In the golden year (153.) (#), gold was found in the states of, listed alphabetically, (154.) and (155.) . The people who rushed to mine it were called (156.) . The gold rush to the first state is known as the (157.) . There were more miners than minerals. A huge underground stash of gold as well as silver called the (158.) was unconvered in the second state, triggering its gold/silver rush. A fantastic amount of gold and silver, worth more than (159.) (#) million was mined by the (160.) . This second state was prematurely added to the Union in the year (161.) (#) to provide (162.) (#) electoral votes for (163.) .


The flood of people during gold rushes created boom towns known as (164.) , which later became (165.) when minerals ran out. One famous such town was (166.) in the state of (167.) .


Big businesses had an advantage over individual family minors since they had big machinery that could cut through the (168.) . Authors like, alphabetically by last name, (169.) and (170.) wrote about the mining frontier.


So called (171.) dominated the cattle industry. Two such families were, alphabetically, the (172.) and the (173.) Swifts . Two gigantic stockyards for cattle and meet were, alphabetically, the cities of (174.) and (175.) . The invention of the (176.) allowed meet to be transported without spoiling.


Under the (177.) system, cattle were guided to cities called (178.) , where they were processed and put onto railroads for shipping. Four such cities were, listed alphabetically and with their states, (179.) , (180.) , (181.) , and (182.) . The man who kept order at the first location just listed was (183.) , who only killed in self-defense or in the line of duty and was shot in the back playing poker. In peak years, the profit for this process reached as high as (184.) (#) percent. The terrible winter of the years (185.) brought temperatures down to (186.) (#) degrees below zero and left thousands of cattle starving and freezing. These cowpeople eventually learned to organize, as in the (187.) , which virtually controlled the state and its legislature.


The (188.) of (189.) (#) provided that a settler could acquire as much as (190.) (#) acres of land, which was (191.) (fraction; x/x) of a section. They would have to live on the land for (192.) (#) years, improve it, and pay a fee of about $(193.) . An alternative allowed settlers to acquire the same amount of land after only (194.) months of residence at a cost of $(195.) per acre. Either option was exempted from debt. This act meant an give away of land as an alternative to the sale of land. During the (196.) (#) years after its passage, about (197.) (fraction; x/x) a million familities took advantage of this act, although (198.) (#) times that many families purchased their land in some way. About (199.) (fraction; x/x) of families using this act were forced to give up their land. Perhaps (200.) (#) times the number of homesteads given to families under this act were given to promotors.




Answers:


1. GREAT WEST
2. SQUARE
3. 1000
4. 1890
5. ARIZONA
6. NEW MEXICO
7. OKLAHOMA
8. UTAH
9. INDIAN TERRITORY
10. 1860
11. 360000
12. SPANISH
13. HORSE
14. CHOLERA
15. SMALLPOX
16. TYPHOID
17. SIOUX
18. CHIPPEWAS
19. MISSISSIPPI
20. CROWS
21. KIOWAS
22. PAWNEES
23. PAWNEES
24. 1873
25. 100
26. FORT LARAMIE
27. 1851
28. FORT ATKINSON
29. 1853
30. RESERVATION SYSTEM
31. GREAT SIOUX
32. OKLAHOMA
33. 1500
34. 4
35. 50000
36. SIOUX
37. MINNESOTA
38. 40
39. 1868
40. 1890
41. TENTH CAVALRY
42. 1/5
43. CUSTER
44. SHERIDAN
45. SHERMAN
46. SANDY CREEK
47. COLORADO
48. J. M. CHIVINGTON
49. 400
50. 1866
51. SIOUX INDIANS
52. BOZEMAN TRAIL
53. MONTANA GOLDFIELDS
54. 81
55. WILLIAM J. FETTERMAN
56. BIG HORN MOUNTAINS
57. WYOMING
58. 0
59. 105
60. FETTERMAN MASSACRE
61. GEORGE ARMSTRONG CUSTER
62. TREATY OF FORT LARAMIE
63. 1868
64. GREAT SIOUX RESERVATION
65. 1874
66. GEORGE ARMSTRONG CUSTER
67. BLACK HILLS
68. SOUTH DAKOTA
69. GOLD
70. SIOUX
71. SITTING BULL
72. SEVENTH CAVALRY
73. 1/2
74. 264
75. CRAZY HORSE
76. 2500
77. LITTLE BIG HORN RIVER
78. BATTLE OF THE LITTLE BIG HORN
79. CUSTER'S LAST STAND
80. 1877
81. NEZ PERCE
82. IDAHO
83. 90
84. GOLD
85. JOSEPH
86. 700
87. 1700
88. 3
89. CONTINENTAL DIVIDE
90. CANADA
91. SITTING BULL
92. BATTLE OF LITTLE BIG HORN
93. IDAHO
94. KANSAS
95. 40
96. APACHE
97. ARIZONA
98. NEW MEXICO
99. GERONIMO
100. HELIOGRAPH
101. BIG MEDICINE
102. FLORIDA
103. OKLAHOMA
104. RAILROAD
105. DISEASES
106. BUFFALO
107. HUNCHBACK COWS
108. BUFFALO CHIPS
109. WILLIAM CODY
110. 4000
111. 18
112. 15
113. 1885
114. 1000
115. YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK
116. HELEN HUNT JACKSON
117. MASSACHUSETTS
118. A CENTURY OF DISHONOR
119. RAMONA
120. CALIFORNIA
121. 600000
122. SUN DANCE
123. GHOST DANCE
124. DAKOTA SIOUX
125. BATTLE OF WOUNDED KNEE
126. 200
127. 29
128. DAWES SEVERALTY ACT
129. 1887
130. 160
131. 25
132. 1924
133. CARLISLE INDIAN SCHOOL
134. PENNSYLVANIA
135. KILL THE INDIAN AND SAVE THE MAN
136. FIELD MATRONS
137. 1880
138. 158
139. 1900
140. 50
141. INDIAN REORGANIZATION ACT
142. INDIAN NEW DEAL
143. 1934
144. TEXAS
145. SASKATCHEWAN
146. 30
147. TRAVOIS
148. DOG
149. MUSTANGS
150. BLACK ELK
151. OGALALA SIOUX
152. WASICHUS
153. 1859
154. COLORADO
155. NEVADA
156. FIFTY-NINERS
157. PIKE'S PEAK
158. COMSTOCK LODE
159. 340
160. KINGS OF COMSTOCK
161. 1864
162. 3
163. ABRAHAM LINCOLN
164. HELLDORADOS
165. GHOST TOWNS
166. VIRGINIA CITY
167. NEVADA
168. QUARTZ
169. BRET HARTE
170. MARK TWAIN
171. BEEF BARONS
172. ARMOURS
173. SWIFTS
174. CHICAGO
175. KANSAS CITY
176. REFRIGERATOR CAR
177. LONG DRIVE
178. COW TOWNS
179. ABILENE, KANSAS
180. CHEYENNE, WYOMING
181. DODGE CITY, KANSAS
182. OGALLALA, NEBRASKA
183. JAMES B. HICKOCK
184. 40
185. 1886-1887
186. 68
187. WYOMING STOCK-GROWERS' ASSOCIATION
188. HOMESTEAD ACT
189. 1862
190. 160
191. 1/4
192. 5
193. 30
194. 6
195. 1.25
196. 40
197. 1/2
198. 5
199. 2/3
200. 10